How Twitter’s Staff Uses Twitter (And Why It Could Cause Problems) | (re-blogged!)

(NOTE: This post was re-blogged as shared reading. Please, follow the reference link at the end of this post to where it was originally published. – Jos Schuurmans; http://ping.fm/HNjT7)

Shared by Jos

Marshall Kirkpatrick writes about the potential disconnect between the people who design, run and govern Twitter, versus the people who use Twitter.

It’s a theme which also keeps coming back in Dave Winer’s writing and in his podcasts with Jay Rosen. I think there is a good chance indeed that, one way or another, a Twitter-like system will have to open up because it is becoming too important for its massive population to be governed by such a small and young company.

The fact that it is becoming a news ecosystem, in my view, will mean that it will have to open up. In this respect, I’m really wondering what’s happening with Identi.ca and Laconi.ca?

“(…) What if the people working at Twitter Inc. aren’t using the service the way many of its power users are, though? We’ve examined the posting and following habits of people on the company’s staff and found that Twitter team members don’t follow very many other people, they aren’t following many of the top developers in their own community and they don’t even Tweet very much. This could be cause for concern among power users who depend on the service as it exists now, much less for those hoping it will be developed for even more powerful use cases. (…)

Why Does This Matter?

Is it important that Twitter staff doesn’t include power users as we understand the term? Dave Winer once explained quite simply why the question of how Twitter is going to make money is important, a related question:

“it could turn out, when Twitter reveals its business model, that it’s something we don’t like. We won’t know where we, the users, fit in — until they tell us how they’re going to make money. And when they tell us, we may not like it.”

(…)”
Reference: http://ping.fm/gYiCR

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