Eleet.fi suggests links based on what you’ve shared on Facebook

(Cross-posted from the Eleet.fi blog)

Hello and welcome to Eleet!

Eleet suggests links to you that you might be interested in, based on links that you and other people have shared on Facebook.

Please, have a look. The more active you are at sharing links on Facebook, the more interesting links we will be able to suggest to you.

‘Eleet’ is Finnish for ‘gestures’. http://eleet.fi is the first public link recommendation service built on a recommendation engine that is being developed through a project called ‘Project Gestures’.

Facebook is the first social web service from which we source shared links – or ‘gestures’ in our jargon. We plan to roll out similar integration with other major services on the Social Web, next up Twitter. Also, we want to enable you to submit any blog or RSS feed as a source of your on-line gestures. Just watch us 🙂

We will publish the source code of the engine’s core technology during September 2011.

During the spring of 2011, our project received recognition as it was selected to the finals of the first-ever ‘Uutisraivaaja’ (‘Newsplorer’) innovation contest sponsored by the Helsingin Sanomat Foundation.

The Foundation is linked to Helsingin Sanomat, one of Finland’s most influential daily news papers. Inspired by the Knight News Challenge in the United States, the contest “(…) seeks ideas for improving and renewing the distribution of information. (…)”

Our project was in part inspired by a tweet from New York University Journalism Professor Jay Rosen, who wrote while linking to one of our earliest blog post on the topic:

“Imagine a personal recommendation system for news based not on consumption habits but on your gestures: authoring and sharing.”

So, the fundamental underlying principle of our engine is that we don’t analyze what you click and read on-line, but what you write and share. When you share a link on Facebook, Twitter or on your blog, that is a very strong indication, or ‘gesture’, that the topic behind the link is relevant to you.

Well, ‘nuff said. Please, take our engine for a spin a let us know what you think!

Hello and welcome to Eleet!

Eleet suggests links to you that you might be interested in, based on links that you and other people have shared on Facebook.

Please, have a look. The more active you are at sharing links on Facebook, the more interesting links we will be able to suggest to you.

Background

‘Eleet’ is Finnish for ‘gestures’. http://eleet.fi is the first public link recommendation service built on a recommendation engine that is being developed through a project called ‘Project Gestures’.

Facebook is the first social web service from which we source shared links – or ‘gestures’ in our jargon. We plan to roll out similar integration with other major services on the Social Web, next up Twitter. Also, we want to enable you to submit any blog or RSS feed as a source of your on-line gestures. Just watch us 🙂

We will publish the source code of the engine’s core technology during September 2011.

During the spring of 2011, our project received recognition as it was selected to the finals of the first-ever ‘Uutisraivaaja’ (‘Newsplorer’) innovation contest sponsored by the Helsingin Sanomat Foundation.

The Foundation is linked to Helsingin Sanomat, one of Finland’s most influential daily news papers. Inspired by the Knight News Challenge in the United States, the contest “(…) seeks ideas for improving and renewing the distribution of information. (…)”

Our project was in part inspired by a tweet from New York University Journalism Professor Jay Rosen, who wrote while linking to one of our earliest blog post on the topic:

“Imagine a personal recommendation system for news based not on consumption habits but on your gestures: authoring and sharing.”

So, the fundamental underlying principle of our engine is that we don’t analyze what you click and read on-line, but what you write and share. When you share a link on Facebook, Twitter or on your blog, that is a very strong indication, or ‘gesture’, that the topic behind the link is relevant to you.

Well, ‘nuff said. Please, take our engine for a spin a let us know what you think!

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‘Web 3.0’, video by Kate Ray (14:25 min.)

Kate Ray's 14:25 minutes video documentary on "Web 3.0". Useful introduction to the concept of the semantic web.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=11529540&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

Web 3.0 from Kate Ray on Vimeo.

Creative Commons License
Web 3.0 by Kate Ray is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

Jay Rosen’s New Media Maxims | YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/v/EqcaBhlPs9k&hl=en_US&fs=1&

@jayrosen_nyu's new media maxims, as he presented them to the World Bank, are…

  1. "Freedom of the press belongs to those who own one" – A.J. Liebling (…and now, because of new media, anyone can own one);
  2. Open systems don't work like closed systems ("Anyone can sign up");
  3. "Sources go direct" (Dave Winer);
  4. Audience atomization has been overcome (People are connected across to one another as effectively as they are connected-up to big institutions).

A shorter version of our Cluetail video

This is a shorter (2:42 min.), faster and slightly self-censored version of Jos Schuurmans's introduction to Cluetail and Cluetail Lunch Date.

The original 3:51 minutes version accompanied Cluetail's submission to the MindTrek Launchpad competition at the MindTrek conference in Tampere, Finland, on October 1st, 2009.

As it happens, Cluetail was not selected to present at the Launchpad event. But we will be there, so please hook up with us and check out our app!

While we're at it, I thought I could embed both the YouTube and the Blip.tv versions, just to see if/how they appear differently.

http://www.youtube.com/v/Mli9nV6FCCk&hl=en&fs=1&

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/AYGfiHQC%5D

[TRANSCRIPT STARTS]

"(…) So, Cluetail is a tribute to the Cluetrain Manifesto and the Long Tail.

We totally dig it that 'markets are conversations', that the
Internet is one huge pool of conversations, and the best clues are
often found in the 'Long Tail'.

If you would like to draw a popularity graph of online
conversations, you would get a typical 'Long Tail' graph, which is a
power law graph which is extended quite indefinitely.

Britney Spears's appearance on the MTV Music Awards may very well be
one of the most popular conversations on the day after the awards.

However, if you would take any individual person apart, and asked them, "What is the most relevant conversation to you today?", it would most likely be a conversation that takes place somewhere down the 'Long Tail'.

Cluetail actually connects people to the online conversation that
are most relevant to them, and to the people who are engaged in those
conversations, who are most relevant to them.

We believe that there is actually an enormous un-tapped value in the 'Long Tail'.

Companies like Nokia and Apple are fairly good at connecting
people to the people who are listed in their contacts list on their
mobile devices
.

Search engines like Google, Yahoo and Bing are fairly good at connecting people to the things that they know how to search for.

Companies like Facebook, FriendFeed, LinkedIn, Plaxo, Twitter and
other 'Social Web' services are starting to be good at connecting
people to the people in their social networks
.

However, all the methods that these services use are based on
popularity and serendipity. In other words: ranking high on Google
results pages, or coincidence
.

Now, at Cluetail [W]e look at the social objects that people
share online. For example, blog posts, social bookmarks on Delicious
and other services, shared reading…

We are developing several applications. Some are for businesses and
organizations, and some are web services that anyone can use.

So, for example if you have a fairly large intranet, Cluetail can
help identify the people in the company who are currently perhaps
working in silos but who might actually talk to each other because they
have similar interests or they are working on similar ideas.

Another example is our 'Lunch Date' application. So, based on your
location and on the social objects that you've shared online, we can
recommend to you a person with whom you might want to have lunch today.

Oh, my phone is ringing.

It looks like my lunch date has arrived, so I'll better go and meet her.

Thank you. (…)"

[TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

Seth Godin: “No one cares about you”

http://www.youtube.com/v/N52OIcwynws&hl=en&fs=1&

(From Seth’s Blog: ‘Four videos about noise, social and decency‘)

When I watched the four videos on Seth’s Blog yesterday, I didn’t immediately grok how important this particular one is. I mean, I re-posted the two clips about blogging and social media because I recognized what he was saying from my own experience.

But “No one cares about you” is actually an eye opener to me. I do get the message now. It explains why press releases and corporate interviews often don’t work. A brand talking about itself and how well it performs doesn’t excite. It’s a much better idea to let others draw those conclusions.

What does excite customers is talking about them and stuff that interests them.

The example Seth gives is very clarifying:

00:58: “(…) If someone’s gonna watch a video, they’re not gonna watch it because they care about you. They’re gonna watch it because they care about me. Me, me, me, me, me, my favorite person me. (…)”

01:15: “(…) If you make a video like the Blendtec guys, the ‘Will It Blend?‘ videos, people will watch it because watching Chuck Norris getting blent in a blender is sort of a hoot. But if you make a video of how your factory is, you know, twelve percent more efficient than it was last year, (yawn), I’m not coming. (…)”

“What matters is: where are the *real* relationships?”

(From Seth's Blog: 'Four videos about noise, social and decency')

In this short video, Seth Godin explains when social networking does or doesn't matter:

01:22: "(…) networking is always important when it's real, and it's always a useless distraction when it's fake (…)"

01:46: "(…) are there people out there whom I would go out of my way for and who would go out of their way for me? That's what you need to keep track of. And the way you get there is by going out of your way for them; and by earning that privilege of one day having that connection be worthwhile. (…)"

http://www.youtube.com/v/r0h0LlCu8Ks&hl=en&fs=1&